Syrup


The Idea Syrup has been used since the very old times in medicine as a mean to transfer the salutary nutrition of vegetables and herbs. The specific syrup is composed of concentrated essence and aroma based upon a sweet flavor. Sometimes fruity, sometimes floral, sometimes sharp tasting.

Naturally concentrated aromas Fancy red, light full yellow syrup, is something that we all are familiar with. The problem with those syrups is that the colors are artificial and the aromas are not always natural. In those practices we oppose syrup with natural aromas and colors of local flowers and herbs.

New Flavors We have not tasted them all yet, there are a lot of unknown and unusual aromas to taste and discover. All of them grow next to us; the land of Crete is full of those, mallow, nettle and plantain, are some of them.

Imagination in gastronomy Syrups in an extended use constitute a challenge for new tastings. So we try to combine the basil, not only with the tomato but with the fruits as well, and the sage not only as a beverage but with cream as well.

Uses Syrups are used diluted 1:5 to 1:8 as beverages with water or soda or mineral water, in lemonades, during the winter with hot water or with the tea, with Champaign or white wine, in Cocktails. No undiluted (as it is), cooking sweet and sour (glaze roast or vegetables, in salads), color and essence in whipped cream and yogurt, in deserts, fruit salads, ice creams, as medicine: Local medicine accredits in many flowers and blossoms curative attributes. Plantain can be very helpful in cough, mint is digestive and also reduces the symptoms of common cold, Hibiscus is consumed to increase the tinkle, helps the metabolism and is also used for the relief from heat.